Once there was this lion who had many friends, big and small. One day the lion got trapped in a net. Help, yelled the lion. I’m coming, said the elephant and with a swing of his trunk he missed the net holding the lion and got trapped in a different net. Help, yelled both the animals and all their large friends came to help, and also got trapped in nets. Help!, they all yelled and then 1,000,000 ants, mice, rats, bees, wasps bit through the net and didn’t get caught.

Aesop: Many small friends can be the best of friends.

Announcer:

And now your host. Kelly Coughlin is a CPA and CEO of BankBosun, a management consulting firm helping bank C Level Officers navigate risk and discover reward. He is the host of the syndicated audio podcast, BankBosun.com. Kelly brings over 25 years of experience with companies like PWC, Lloyds Bank, and Merrill Lynch. On the podcast, Kelly interviews key executives in the banking ecosystem to provide bank C suite officers, risk management, technology, and investment ideas and solutions to help them navigate risks and discover reward. And now your host, Kelly Coughlin.

Kelly Coughlin:

Greetings. This is Kelly Coughlin, CPA and CEO of Bank Bosun, helping C-suite bank executives manage risk, regulation, and revenue creation in a sea of opportunities and threats. Today, we’re going to talk about a tactic that can without any doubt generate new customers and create new revenues for a bank. But first some background. I started my business career back in 1982 at Merrill Lynch selling mortgage backed securities and municipal bonds to banks and credit unions. In those days, I kept a 3″ by 5″ card box of contacts filed two ways, alphabetically and chronologically by next date of contact. I would staple a new business card of a banker to the 3″ by 5″ card with all the contact information on the alpha card. On the chronological card I would have the name of the individual and the company and the contact history with dates I met with them, calls I made, information I sent, and the next future contact date.

Looking back now, I don’t see how I was able to manage that system. Very inefficient, but very effective, provided you recorded all activities and filed each card correctly. There was frequently a panic if a call came in from a contact and you had to scramble around to identify the contact in the alpha box and then locate the contact history in the chronological box. In 1986, I bought one the very first personal computers by Compaq. This is a couple of years before Windows. I think I paid about $8000. Got a long term five-year lease for it. I bought some software that had a very primitive contact management system. It was called Exsell, spelled E-X-S-E-L-L, not related to the spreadsheet software. I don’t know what happened to that company, but as primitive as that software was, it changed my life. At least my life in terms of sales marketing. That one simple software reduced my contact management maintenance time by 90%. It was more effective in that there were fewer errors and now more efficient, and that I only had to maintain one record in which the contact info and the past and future contact info was maintained on that contact record.

The reason I tell you that story is, in today’s podcast we’re going to learn about a sales and marketing tactic that will have as great an impact on how you identify new business relationships, develop those relationships, and convert those relationships to new customers. But this podcast isn’t for everybody. Specifically, it’s only three types of bankers interested in growing revenues. One, they are using LinkedIn now but really don’t do much with it in terms of generating new clients. Number two, they are using LinkedIn now to generate new clients but spend more than 45 minutes per day on it. And three, they’re not using LinkedIn now because they haven’t really seen the benefits of it but would like to see the benefits. You will notice the common word in these three categories is LinkedIn. Why is LinkedIn so important? Because LinkedIn provides a platform that enables people to cost effectively connect with over 313 million members in over 200 countries and territories. No other platform allows that. Please note I did not say efficiently. I said cost effectively. In my accounting world, effectively implies accuracy and functionality, and efficiency implies time and effort, which for many of us equates to cost.

Most of you use some sort of spreadsheet software. Excel is the most popular. On my first computer, I used Lotus 1-2-3. Remember the backslash you had to use before you entered anything in that program? Painful. I’ve been a power user of Excel for many, many years, yet I estimate I only utilize about 15% of Excel’s total functionality. The same is true with LinkedIn. In today’s podcast, we’re going to focus a little bit on a more effective use of some of the hidden functionality of LinkedIn, kind of like that moment when I discovered the pivot table function in Excel. That was a brilliant moment. More importantly, though, we’re going to talk about a more efficient use of LinkedIn. Then you can rest assured this is not some theoretical podcast on the benefits of social media, nor is it on the benefits of advertising on LinkedIn. This is focused exclusively on using LinkedIn to identify target customers, develop a relationship with them, and convert them to new customers, all within a minimal amount of time. So, if you’re in category number two, spending over 45 minutes a day on LinkedIn will show you how to reduce that to 12 minutes per day, max.

If you are in category number one, only using LinkedIn to maintain your profile, we’ll show you how to uncover a couple of hidden functions and use your profile to identify new customers and new revenues. If you are in category number three and aren’t using LinkedIn at all but are curious about it, this might be the perfect thing for you, because one is probably kept you away from LinkedIn is you perceive it as a waste of time. For many, it is just that, a complete waste of time. I know this firsthand. I was in category number one. I used LinkedIn mainly as a way for people to find me, and somewhat, I was in category number three. I didn’t use it very much. I frankly was never in category number two, spending over 45 minutes a day on it, because I never saw the value of doing that. But I’m in a whole new category now. I’m going to call it Category AAA. I spend less than 10 minutes a day and generate new contacts and new relationships every single day, and frankly love it. All because I’m a software as a service solution created by Don Brailsford, the CEO of Social Leverage Venture, Inc. It delivers revenues. It’s inexpensive. In fact, I can make it cost $0 for certain banks, but that’s a separate discussion. With all that said, I want to introduce Don Brailsford, the CEO of Social Leverage Ventures, Inc., located in Wilmington, North Carolina. Don, are you on the line?

Don Brailsford:

I am. Thanks so much Kelly. Thanks for having me.

Kelly Coughlin:

Thank you, Don. I hope you’re having a great morning. It’s Saturday morning. Why don’t we start out with just a real short introduction of who you are, what you’re doing? Family, that sort of thing. Give us some context of who Don Brailsford is.

Don Brailsford:

Sure. I’ve been in the financial services space and the marketing space and a serial entrepreneur basically my whole life. I’ve done real estate development. Grew up in Connecticut. Came out of a traditional business education. Next, I ended up teaching some classes at the University of Connecticut, but my real love is marketing. I love to talk to people. It’s my life. I enjoy it, and I’m always fascinated by how hard it is to get good ideas and quality people together. The friction between getting the right person to the right idea just amazes me because it seems like we’ve built so many bad ways of “selling” or marketing that there’s more resistance than there is acceptance. I’m 59 years old. I live in a little town just north of Wilmington of the water called Hampstead. I have a 20- and a 21-year-old son, and I’ve got a beautiful Catahoula. I think the most telling time in our history was when the immigrants came to America.

The immigrants came in and most of them were destitute. They had nothing, but the first thing they did was they formed networks. Those are the neighborhoods. Those neighborhoods, all those people did was everything they could for each other. If someone knew where there was a good place to buy food or a good place to live or there was a job, or anything they could do. Those groups, despite having absolutely nothing, very quickly prospered, and it wasn’t to the detriment of anybody. It was to the benefit of everybody. That rising tide lifted all ships. That’s what great networking does. It’s not, I’ll do this for you Kelly if you do it for me. It’s, Kelly, if I can help you in any way, let me know. I’ll be looking for ways to help you, and it would be great if you did that for me too. If we both did that we got 20 other or 30 other or 40 other people to do that, we’d be unlike everybody else in the business industry, where very few people have anyone trying to help them succeed. If you can become one of those rare few who can put a team together where everybody is trying to help everybody succeed, your life becomes infinitely easier. You have fellow travelers in your journey, and it’s much more enjoyable, and life becomes just much, much sweeter. I just love facilitating that for people.

Kelly Coughlin:

Yeah, that’s well said. You use the term immigrant networking. I use the term ecosystem. We’re now all part of a similar ecosystem. We’re talking to community and regional banks, and everyone participating in that ecosystem. That is our audience for this podcast, and that’s the audience for Bank Bosun as well. Catahoula? Is Catahoula a boat? Or is that an animal.

Don Brailsford:

Catahoula is C-A-T-A-H-O-U-L-A. Catahoula is a dog. It’s the oldest cur in the United States. It’s actually the state dog for Louisiana. Your listeners down in the Deep South will be familiar with the dog. It’s a dog bred for hunting wild boar and bear, which makes it sound ferocious, but the fact is they’re incredibly sweet, amazingly fast, and beautiful, gentle animals.

Kelly Coughlin:

You’ve used the term immigrant networking. I use the term ecosystem. So, let’s stick with the term ecosystem for our purposes. When we look at an ecosystem, many organizations currently use LinkedIn as a way to connect to their ecosystem. In the subject of this podcast and my discussion with you, is a more efficient use of LinkedIn. You listened to my introduction. I talked about the primitive version of my sales and marketing experience at Merrill Lynch, where it was a 3×5 card system. This is free technology. Then, there is some CRM software that was available for nothing. At that time, nothing really enabled us to connect to a network or an ecosystem, but LinkedIn is kind of the first one to do that. How do you see most organizations use LinkedIn? I know you have a more efficient way of using LinkedIn, but before we get into that, let’s describe what’s the state of the state before you guys are involved with it.

Don Brailsford:

Honestly, LinkedIn, nine years ago the marketing that I was doing was much more conventional. I had a mail center and a call center, and we did a lot of work doing seminars. We’d set up seminars for our clients in their communities and created the idea of having online sign ups. We did online sign ups, which is a whole novel thing. Did automated phone follow ups to follow mail that we sent. We’d call up and tell people that we were writing to them about the letter that we’d sent them to and invite them. That was all kind of novel, but it was also slow and you could see the costs just spiraling out of control, and you could see this this nascent social media coming on, Facebook coming on. Back then, it was Myspace. Nine years ago, I switched. I just couldn’t do the seminars anymore because I just felt like so many guys were spending so much money and it was such a huge risk for them. A lot of people showing up just because they were planning their weeks around where their free food was I looked at the different social media spaces, and LinkedIn was a few years earlier?I don’t remember exactly when it was, but I joined LinkedIn because I always like to check out the new stuff. It had a couple hundred thousand people. I think it was seven or eight hundred thousand when I first got into it.

I didn’t pay attention for a bit, but then I started paying attention, and nine years ago, they were in the millions. They started to make sense, and I found out about the groups and things and I said, gosh, there’s an opportunity. Never mind the seminar. If I put 2,000 or 3,000 people with someone, that’s a lifetime supply. We started going into LinkedIn, and LinkedIn back then, everything was free because they used either the crack cocaine sales model where you give everything away until everybody is hooked and then they can’t go away because they’re so addicted to it. They’ve built an amazing, one of the most valuable databases in the world, honestly. Everybody worth knowing has dumped their information into LinkedIn and has presented themselves on LinkedIn. It’s amazing that people on LinkedIn who might not ever take your phone call or an e-mail or anything from you will connect with you on LinkedIn and then you can send them a message. One of the hardest things we had to do when we started out was just convince people. They’d say, well why will they connect with me?

I said, because they just do, because people are social, because we’re pack animals. That’s what they want. A lot of times I had to spend 30 minutes convincing people. I promise you they will. They just will. We want to be connected even if we’re wealthy and important and famous. We still want to have connections. It’s such a small world when you have relationships. Going back to the immigrant thing, you’d be amazed at who knows who and who meets who. If you treat people right and if they know what you have to offer and what you’re trying to accomplish, and they know that you’re trying to help them with theirs, reciprocity is incredibly powerful. LinkedIn as it started out was just basically they started off thinking, okay, we’re going to get people jobs. Then, they quickly realized that they had this massive database of all these people. I frankly believe they can say whatever story they want, but I believe that their users created the idea that actually it’s even better as a sales and marketing and partnering and affiliating and joint venturing tool than it is hiring tool. I think the biggest part is, they do more business as a result of trying to find prospects and clients than they do trying to find employees.

Kelly Coughlin:

How does one go from category number one, using LinkedIn mainly as a way for people to find each other, to category two and three? Especially number two which is using it as a way to more actively do business with each other? Connecting with clients that might be looking to do a business loan or looking for wealth management services or looking for trust services or looking for bank cards or services? How do they go from passive use to active use?

Don Brailsford:

One word, systematically. Nike said, just do it. It’s right. You sit down and on a daily basis, LinkedIn gives you these great tools for searching. You can search for exactly the kind of people you want to work with. I would submit to you that unlike in the financial services of the life insurance industry where everybody is a sales person, bankers aren’t viewed that way, so they have a big advantage. When their banker reaches out to connect you, you’re like, sure. I’ll connect with a banker, because I might need a bank. The thing I didn’t get to say in the beginning, or I didn’t think to say it, I’m a huge proponent of community banks. I so much prefer a local bank that understands the community and is invested in the community and cares about the community. The way that you work is you sit down and you take LinkedIn and you say, all right, we what are the people we can best help? What kind of people are we looking for?

You do a search, and they have these great search tools. Basically, you pick what industries you want to work with. Who is the person in the business? Do you have specific businesses? You can target anything you want almost. Then, you just reach out and you send them a contact request and it has to be personalized. Kelly, if it was you and you were the client I wanted to reach, I’d reach out to you and I’d identify you as the CEO and I sort of manufacturing company that I would certainly love to make a loan to and get deposits and things from. I would say, hey Kelly, we’re a local community bank and we always like to connect with local business leaders with the opportunity of perhaps helping each other out. We’re also involved in many local events and things. Let’s connect and hopefully get coffee and just get an introduction and see if there’s ways we can help each other. I’d sign it, Don, and that’s all I would say.

Kelly Coughlin:

Let’s take an example. Let’s say I’m a bank down in St. Petersburg, Florida. My footprint is in a 120-mile radius of St. Pete. I do a search on LinkedIn and find all businesses roughly within that radius, and then I could even refine it further by look for manufacturers or look for whatever target profile.

Don Brailsford:

Absolutely. The way you do it is as you would do?it’s not exactly 120. So, it would do a 100-mile radius, is their biggest radius. You can always move your center, so you can move your radius around. Do 100-mile radius and then you just search what kind of business you want. It tells you what industry you want to get and you can search for particular businesses if you want if you know them, but if you don’t know the business but you just know, we work well with manufacturers or we work well with service companies or we work well with professionals or doctors, attorneys and people like that, the kind of people that can bring you business. You reach out and you say, here’s all the people. Again, I would submit to you that for bankers, it is a target-rich environment because they’re not viewed as salespeople they have to be defended against even though there is a sales function, very definitely a sales function, in it. It’s just not viewed that way. They’re going to be pretty well received, and they’re going to get an opportunity to at least get to the door and create a relationship and do that.

You could so easily keep your marketing or your business development staff could be steadily building on a daily basis. You could have two or three new introductions and meetings and get togethers. You could have 20 or 30 people a day coming into your ecosystem where you connected to them and you can start communicating with them. Reach out to connect with them, and then on your connection message you could say, I’d love to get together and have coffee. There’s two ways they can respond. They can just accept your connection request and become connected to you, which is a win because now the door is open. Or, they can respond and say, yeah Kelly, I’d love to have coffee. If they say, I’d love to have coffee, hey you’re in dialogue. There you go. Now you’re off where you wanted to be. If they don’t respond, I would send another message to you.

If I’d sent that to you and all you said was, yeah, I’ll accept your connection, but you didn’t respond to me, I’d send you another message a couple days later. Hey, Kelly. Thanks so much for connecting with me. I love to get together and just get an opportunity to at least buy you a coffee and hear about your business and tell you about the kinds of things we’re doing in the community. Would you be available for coffee sometime next week? Then, I would wait and I would wait another week to 10 days. Ten days later I’m like, hey, Kelly. Hope you’re having a great week. Just wanted to put this back on the top of your inbox. I’m sure you’re very, very busy and you may not get to LinkedIn very often, but I am still very interested in getting together. Hopefully we can work that out. If you’re available any time next week, please let me know one or the other. That would be great.

Kelly Coughlin:

Or, if they’ve done say a podcast, you could send a link to a podcast that say, hey we just did this podcast on estate planning and trust work, and have a listen. Tell me what you think.

Don Brailsford:

Absolutely. That’s the great thing. It’s a win when they connect. As soon as someone connects with you, you can go to their profile. You get all their information about them. Their titles. A lot of times they’ll have addresses and phone numbers and Twitter handles and their websites that they use. You’ll know who they know, and that’s huge, because it might be that I get to you, but who I really wanted to get to is the guy that you know. The guy that you know, the guy who’s the CEO of the company that I desperately want to work with because there’s a huge opportunity they’re going to build a big building and I want to make them a loan. I’m going to sit down with you and say, hey, Kelly. I was really impressed with your profile and the connections you’ve got are spectacular. You’ve got a great reputation in town. I see you know Bob Jones over at Dewey, Reitman, Howe.

I’d love to meet with Bob. I know they’re starting a big project and I’d love to chat with him about that. Would you be kind enough to make an introduction? Introductions are better than just connection requests because obviously, they’re a third-person endorsement, basically. It’s an opportunity to get in there. Most of the guys I work with are identified as, and are in fact, salespeople. Bankers aren’t viewed that way. So, when a banker asked to be introduced to somebody, you’re like, oh yeah. Nobody’s afraid to introduce a banker. Again, target-rich environment. Just an unbelievable opportunity. I know the banking business is very tough, but the connections and the opportunities to get to the door and make your pitch and create the relationships are absolutely there.

Kelly Coughlin:

Let’s back up for a moment. In the webinar when I first got introduced to you, I believe you had a five-step process that you envisioned.

Don Brailsford:

Yeah. You target the people you want. You do your searches. You try to niche it down as much as you can. I actually think the biggest problem banks are going to have, they’ll have too many responses. You want to make sure that all your responses are as close to exactly what you want as you can get, because you could keep a business development office busy constantly. My gut feeling, because I know the reaction that bankers get, so that’s what I think. You target first and then you contact. You target and then you send out your connection request. Then you connect and you nurture, and you nurture that by keep prodding it along. If they don’t respond to you, just keep prodding it along, that nurturing. As you said brilliantly, establish value in the relationship. Show people that it’s not just about, I don’t view you as a commission or you’re not just an automatic sale. This is a relationship. I want to be helpful. How can I help you? Who can I introduce you to? Is there anything else?

That, by the way, is one of the most powerful things you can do. As you build these connections, you’re going to start having the ability to connect people, make some powerful connections for other people. So, it’s target, contact, connect, then nurture. The nurturing is, you share information with them, you take the opportunity, you keep pushing them along towards having a meeting or invite them to a webinar, invite them to lunch and learn. Send them podcasts. Ideally, here’s a podcast that covers this, whatever it is. Anything you have of value, and just show people that I’m a go giver, as they say. That’s a great book by the way, Go Giver. Then, after that is, just sell. The great thing about it is, when you do it like that, they’re not a transaction. They’re a relationship, and that sales lead to not only more sales because they’ll keep working with you, but it also leads to referrals.

The referrals are automatic. They just keep coming. People want to feel good about what they did. If I refer someone to someone who can help them, it makes me feel good. I think that you’re the kind of person who makes people feel good and does things that help them. I’m going to refer you actively because it benefits me. It makes me look good. It makes me feel important. It validates me as a person. That’s how referrals work. They don’t do it because it’s good for you. Human beings don’t work that way. Mother Teresa was self-centered, and I say that tongue in cheek, but the fact is she did what she did. It made her feel good. Thank God, she was an amazing person and did the most unbelievable things. Human beings act in self interest at all times, and one of those things are when we feel good about helping someone else, it’s still self-centered although it’s altruistic in that way.

Kelly Coughlin:

I wrote down five things. Identify, contact, connect, nurture, and sell. That can take an extraordinary amount of time. I did a certain amount of that every day for the entire ecosystem before I got involved with your software solution. Frankly, it was quite painful. It just takes up an inordinate amount of time. But what got me interested in your deal is you reduce that by 80%. Let’s talk about that.

Don Brailsford:

Sure. You send me home and tell me here’s 15 pieces of paper you got to fill out, and you get to make an entry over here, and don’t forget to write this letter, don’t forget that spreadsheet. I’m like, oh please, shoot me now. I don’t want to spend 20 minutes doing that because that’s awful. That’s painful. It’s just too time consuming to sit down and execute. Our system does 50 initial outreaches a day. Then, it also does up to four follow ups for all of them from all the ones that have gone back a month. It’s talking about literally thousands of communications over the course of a month, which just fills the pipeline. If you do that yourself, you’re going to spend four hours a day. You’re going to sit there for four hours a day cutting and pasting and personalizing, and cutting and pasting and personalizing so that people get something from you that doesn’t look like, we’re both on LinkedIn. We should connect. Don. That’s not a connection request that’s going to get anybody to work with you.

Kelly Coughlin:

Congratulations on your anniversary. I hope you have a good day.

Don Brailsford:

Exactly. People like a lot of things. I’m sorry. I’ve been in social media for nine years. I never even noticed when somebody like my stuff. To me it’s like, okay. Good, I’ve got some likes, but I didn’t chase the guy down. Hey, thanks for liking my stuff. Another thing that LinkedIn or social media experts like to say is, you should post articles. That’s great. Questions under that. Talk about taking time. Oh, my God. It’s really very, very simple. Honestly. It’s very simple but it’s very time consuming, and it requires discipline and consistency. I found in my brief history on the planet earth that I’m a lot more consistent when the machine is doing my consistency. It does a lot better job of showing up every day and never getting bored and never getting tired and executing when it’s a piece of software or it’s a machine and it’s not me.

I seem to have these problems of getting distracted, having to chase my dogs because he got out. I have a better idea. Not feeling like it that day. When you have a system where you know every day, every day out there, your work’s getting done, and the sole thing that we say for the clients is the things that human beings have to do. You get to pick who you want to go after. Then, once they start communicating with you, once you get into dialogue and it’s interpersonal communication which we all love, that gets handed off. All of the, keep nudging, keep nudging, keep nudging, keep nudging, keep delivering, keep nudging. That’s all automated.

Kelly Coughlin:

Let’s take the five categories. Identification first. Does your system reduce the time involved in that?

Don Brailsford:

We use all the same things for searching that LinkedIn does, but ours is sort of easier to do. It’s just a few clicks. I wouldn’t really look at it as time saving so much as setting it up. Once you set it up where you really saved a bunch of time, it’s because it’s not the initial figuring out how you want to go after, and that search comes up and there’s 283 them. Well, now I’ve got to sit there and by hand put together 283 messages that say Kelly and then Bob and then Mary and then Eric and then whatever. Then, putting some information in it about them and then changing the message and putting my signature. Our system, you write the message that you want. If I’m writing to a whole bunch of manufacturing executives I’m going to say something about the manufacturing field, let’s say something about our firm. We’re very active in manufacturing industry locally. Heard great things about you. Love to get together and have coffee and meet and discuss ways that we might be able to assist you. Then, our system will go through and just deliver all those for you.

Then, it’s not just that message. It’s the follow up message. When people connect with you, if they don’t respond, basically you just go, okay, and you wait, and the system will send out the follow up. Hey, when we connected a couple days ago, as I mentioned we’d love to get together for coffee. Still serious about that. Would you be available sometime next week? Oh, and by the way, here’s an interesting article you might like about tax breaks for manufacturing concerns that were created this year. Whatever it is. I’m making that up, obviously. Then, the third message and the fourth, all the way to an email. You sent three messages by LinkedIn, and then the last one you should send by e-mail because you do have your e-mail.

Some people don’t spend a lot of time on LinkedIn, and some people don’t have that LinkedIn messages forwarded to their e-mail. So, try them a couple three times on LinkedIn and then you say, well, I’m just going to reach out to you on e-mail. The last message to you might have said, hey Kelly. We connected a while back. I mentioned I want to meet with you and reached out to you a couple of times and haven’t heard anything. It occurred to me you might not be on LinkedIn very often. Is this a better way to communicate? What I said to you was, I’d love to get together and have coffee. I’ve got this, this, and this to offer. If you can let me know one way or another. I certainly don’t want to waste your time, and I hope you’re having a great week. At that point, you’re going to get a response sometime. You can’t ignore four communications.

If they do, at that point, who cares? It’s nice to be able to say, some will, some won’t. So what? Someone’s waiting. As long as you always have someone ready to go to, you don’t feel like you’re ready to starve. It’s awful exciting to know that every day I’ve got this long list of people to see, and my biggest problem is I don’t have enough time for all my new meetings and new opportunities, versus I don’t know how I’m going to get to see that guy. I don’t have anything going on. My boss wants a report of my activities. Not real happy about that.

Kelly Coughlin:

What kind of time reduction do you see users would experience?

Don Brailsford:

It does what would take a human being, some nights it could be four hours. Some nights, you might be able to knock it out in one or one and a half if you just put your head down and just went like a maniac. Bottom line is, on a daily basis, your responsibility is open up your inbox and see if there’s anybody who responded to you, who you need to talk to, and tag them that they did that so the system knows, okay, you got this. We’re done with our sequence, and that’s it. Fifteen, 20 minutes to do what needs to be done versus an hour and a half to four hours is, I think, a pretty substantial time savings. I think you’d be a superstar in the banking industry with this. I really do.

Kelly Coughlin:

That covers what I wanted to cover, Don. one of the things I always end with?I didn’t give you a heads up on this, but this might be a little bit of a curve ball. I’ll give you the choice of giving us one of your favorite quotes, or tell us one of the dumbest, stupidest things you’ve ever done in your business career.

Don Brailsford:

My favorite quote is, I’ve learned so much from my mistakes, I’m thinking of making a few more.

Kelly Coughlin:

Don, thanks again for your time, and we’ll be in touch.

That concludes my interview with Don Brailsford, a LinkedIn marketing guru. I have negotiated a discounted fee with Don for community banks only. He shares my commitment to helping community banks succeed, and he’s offered us a great program at $97 a month with the final two months at no charge. You should know that in order to use his LinkedIn marketing application, you need to subscribe to LinkedIn’s Sales Navigator program, and that is around $75 a month. LinkedIn is free if you just want to post your own profile, but if you want to use it to really help get business, you need Navigator. If you use Navigator, you absolutely need this application. $97 a month to save two to four hours per day. That is a savings of about 60 hours per month. So, if your time is worth at least $1.60 per hour, then you need this. I use it and I love it. That’s it for me. I’m Kelly Coughlin, CPA and CEO of Bank Bosun. Thank you.

Announcer:

We want to thank you for listening to the syndicated audio program, BankBosun.com The audio content is produced and syndicated by Seth Greene, Market Domination. Video content is produced by The Guildmaster Studio, Keenan Bobson Boyle. The voice introduction is me, Karim Kronfli. The program is hosted by Kelly Coughlin. If you like this program, please tell us. If you don’t, please tell us how we can improve it. Now, some disclaimers. Kelly is licensed with the Minnesota State Board of Accountancy as a Certified Public Accountant. The views expressed here are solely those of Kelly Coughlin and his guests in their private capacity and do not in any way represent the views of any other agent, principal, employer, employee, vendor or supplier.
Check out this episode!